‘Pandas of birds’ show up in Beijing thanks to improved ecological environment

By Hua Fang from People’s Daily

 

The trace of reed parrotbills, a rare species unique to China, were found around a wild animal disease surveillance station on the outskirts of Beijing, said the capital’s greening bureau in a recent news release published on the official website of state forestry administration.

 

It’s known that the 18-centimeter long bird, neither crow nor sparrow, is endemic to China. It’s named “Zhendan” in Chinese, as the first specimen of the type was found in east China’s Nanjing and “Zhendan” is how ancient Indian addressed China.

 

Reed parrotbill, what is now a living fossil of birds that once existed alongside dinosaurs, has been on the planet for about 450 million years.

 

Owing to the scarcity, the bird inhabited in reeds only is hailed as “pandas of birds,” and has been listed as a global endangered species and included into the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, the world’s most comprehensive inventory of the global conservation status of plant and animal species.

 

Birds are likely to live and breed in a quiet and sound ecological environment that features a complete food chain and ample food, said Zhang Zhiming, director of the Division of Wildlife Conservation at the Beijing Gardening and Greening Bureau.

 

The appearance of reed parrotbills, to some extent, indicates the improved ecosystem around the Niukouyu area, he added.

Since Niukouyu terrestrial wild animal surveillance station was built in 2006, local ecosystem has seen gradual improvement with thriving plankton, fish and shrimp and an increasing number of birds attracted to live or spend winter there.

 

Pics:

Reed parrotbills live in the reeds. (Photo: People’s Daily Online)

Reed parrotbills live in the reeds. (Photo: People’s Daily Online)

 

Reed parrotbills find food during the cold weather. (Photo: People’s Daily Online)

Reed parrotbills find food during the cold weather. (Photo: People’s Daily Online)

 

 

Reed parrotbills find food during the cold weather. (Photo: People’s Daily Online)

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